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Ἀπεκρίθη αὐτοῖς ὁ Ἰησοῦς, Οὐκ ἐγὼ ὑμᾶς τοὺς δώδεκα ἐξελεξάμην, καὶ ἐξ ὑμῶν εἷς διάβολός ἐστιν;
RBT Greek Interlinear:
611  [list]
ΛΟΓΕΙΟΝ
Apekrithē
Ἀπεκρίθη
Separated
V-AIP-3S
846  [list]
ΛΟΓΕΙΟΝ
autois
αὐτοῖς
to themselves
PPro-DM3P
3588  [list]
ΛΟΓΕΙΟΝ
ho

the
Art-NMS
2424  [list]
ΛΟΓΕΙΟΝ
Iēsous
Ἰησοῦς
Salvation
N-NMS
3756  [list]
ΛΟΓΕΙΟΝ
Ouk
Οὐκ
not
Adv
1473  [list]
ΛΟΓΕΙΟΝ
egō
ἐγὼ
myself
PPro-N1S
4771  [list]
ΛΟΓΕΙΟΝ
hymas
ὑμᾶς
yourselves
PPro-A2P
3588  [list]
ΛΟΓΕΙΟΝ
tous
τοὺς
the
Art-AMP
1427  [list]
ΛΟΓΕΙΟΝ
dōdeka
δώδεκα
twelve
Adj-AMP
1586  [list]
ΛΟΓΕΙΟΝ
exelexamēn
ἐξελεξάμην
chose
V-AIM-1S
2532  [list]
ΛΟΓΕΙΟΝ
kai
καὶ
and
Conj
1537  [list]
ΛΟΓΕΙΟΝ
ex
ἐξ
from out
Prep
4771  [list]
ΛΟΓΕΙΟΝ
hymōn
ὑμῶν
of yourselves
PPro-G2P
1520  [list]
ΛΟΓΕΙΟΝ
heis
εἷς
one
Adj-NMS
1228  [list]
ΛΟΓΕΙΟΝ
diabolos
διάβολός
an accuser
Adj-NMS
1510  [list]
ΛΟΓΕΙΟΝ
estin
ἐστιν
is
V-PIA-3S
RBT Translation:
Answered themselves the Salvation, "Did not I choose yourselves, the twelve, and from out of yourselves one is an accuser?75
LITV Translation:
Jesus answered them, Did I not choose you, the Twelve? Yet one of you is a devil!
ESV Translation:
Jesus answered them, “Did I not choose you, the twelve? And yet one of you is a devil.”

Footnotes

75

Devil

The literal meaning of "διάβολος" (diabolos) in Ancient Greek is "slanderer" or "accuser."

The English word "devil" ultimately derives from the Greek word "διάβολος" (diabolos). Here's how the evolution occurred:

  1. From Greek to Latin: The Greek word "διάβολος" (diabolos) was borrowed into Latin as "diabolus." In Latin, "diabolus" retained the meaning of "slanderer" or "accuser," but it also began to be associated with the concept of the devil due to its usage in Christian texts.

  2. From Latin to Old English: With the spread of Christianity into England, the Latin term "diabolus" was introduced to Old English as "deofol" or "dēofol." In Old English, "deofol" referred specifically to the devil, the supreme evil being in Christian theology.

  3. Development in Middle English: In Middle English, the word evolved further, retaining its meaning of "devil" but also taking on broader connotations related to evil, temptation, and malevolent supernatural beings.

  4. Modern English: In modern English, "devil" continues to be used to refer to the chief evil spirit in Christian belief, as well as to malevolent or mischievous supernatural beings in folklore and mythology.