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Τῇ ἐπαύριον ἠθέλησεν ἐξελθεῖν εἰς τὴν Γαλιλαίαν, καὶ εὑρίσκει Φίλιππον, καὶ λέγει αὐτῷ ὁ Ἰησοῦς, Ἀκολούθει μοι.
RBT Greek Interlinear:
3588  [list]
ΛΟΓΕΙΟΝ

Τῇ
the
Art-DFS
1887  [list]
ΛΟΓΕΙΟΝ
epaurion
ἐπαύριον
next day
Adv
2309  [list]
ΛΟΓΕΙΟΝ
ēthelēsen
ἠθέλησεν
has willed
V-AIA-3S
1831  [list]
ΛΟΓΕΙΟΝ
exelthein
ἐξελθεῖν
to go out
V-ANA
1519  [list]
ΛΟΓΕΙΟΝ
eis
εἰς
into
Prep
3588  [list]
ΛΟΓΕΙΟΝ
tēn
τὴν
the
Art-AFS
1056  [list]
ΛΟΓΕΙΟΝ
Galilaian
Γαλιλαίαν
Galilee
N-AFS
2532  [list]
ΛΟΓΕΙΟΝ
kai
καὶ
and
Conj
2147  [list]
ΛΟΓΕΙΟΝ
heuriskei
εὑρίσκει
he finds
V-PIA-3S
5376  [list]
ΛΟΓΕΙΟΝ
Philippon
Φίλιππον
Philip
N-AMS
2532  [list]
ΛΟΓΕΙΟΝ
kai
καὶ
and
Conj
3004  [list]
ΛΟΓΕΙΟΝ
legei
λέγει
he is speaking
V-PIA-3S
846  [list]
ΛΟΓΕΙΟΝ
autō
αὐτῷ
to himself
PPro-DM3S
3588  [list]
ΛΟΓΕΙΟΝ
ho

the
Art-NMS
2424  [list]
ΛΟΓΕΙΟΝ
Iēsous
Ἰησοῦς
Salvation
N-NMS
190  [list]
ΛΟΓΕΙΟΝ
Akolouthei
Ἀκολούθει
Follow
V-PMA-2S
1473  [list]
ΛΟΓΕΙΟΝ
moi
μοι
myself
PPro-D1S
RBT Translation:
His name is Lover of the Horse
Tomorrow he desired to come out63b into the Land of Circuit ("Galilaia").64 And he is finding Lover of the Horse,65 and the Salvation is saying to himself, "Follow myself."
Unsplit.
Only horses (and other members of the equine family, such as donkeys and zebras) have a single, large, unsplit hoof on each foot. Hence, the symbolic significance of horses and donkeys.
LITV Translation:
And on the morrow, Jesus desired to go out into Galilee. And He found Philip, and says to him, Follow me!
ESV Translation:
The next day Jesus decided to go to Galilee. He found Philip and said to him, “Follow me.”

Footnotes

63b

Greek "ἔρχομαι" (érkhomai) - This verb primarily means "to come." With the "ἐξ-" it becomes "ἐξέρχομαι" meaning "coming out" properly. Coming in and coming out are necessary words to understand the whole of the dual nature of the feminine. From the mother of dead ones to the mother of living ones.

64

Strong’s #G1056, Galilaia. Of Hebrew origin from #1551 and #1550, galil which means revolving, rolling, a turning. Used of the pivot rod of Solomon’s revolving 2-panel door. The root Hebrew verb is galal #1556 to roll, roll away.

65

Philip’s name can be translated, so why not translate it? Strong’s #5376, Phillipos. From philo = beloved, friendly and hippos = horse. Horse-loving, lover of horses.